Ellen Elizabeth Thomas

- a single woman in NSW -
Thomas:  Helen Elizabeth, [Ellen Elizabeth/ Elizabeth Ellen/Nellie] born Sydney, 1873 daughter of John
Alexander Thomas and Mary Jane Finnamore and sister of my great grandfather Henry Thomas

Children:

Albert Thomas: 'Nellie' aged 18 gave birth to an illegitimate child named Albert on 23rd September 1891 at
Raglan Street, Waterloo. Nellie was the informant. Mrs Widgery was present at the birth. Albert Thomas aged 1
year and 5 months died at Ragland Street Waterloo on 1st March 1893. Jane Thomas, grandmother was the
informant. Cause of death was marasmus [malnutrition] and pneumonia. Length of illness was six weeks. Albert
is buried with Grandmother Jane Ann Thomas [she would in fact be his great grandmother].  

Gladys Thomas: born 18th September 1904 at 101 Glenmore Road Paddington, which is the address of the
Women's Hospital. Mother is Ellen Elizabeth Thomas aged 31 and a spinster born Surry Hills. Informant was
Ellen Elizabeth Thomas, mother, of Benevolent Society, Quay Street, Sydney. Witness was Marion Marsden.
Present at the birth were Charles MacLaurin [a prominent Sydney surgeon] and Maggie Cunningham [Margaret
Cunningham was a nurse, recorded at 101 Glenmore Road in the 1904 Electoral Roll]
The Royal Hospital for Women is a maternity hospital that was established at Glenmore Road Paddington in 1901
by the Benevolent Society. It was designated the Royal Hospital for Women in 1904 and a new building opened in
1905. The Royal Hospital for Women organised many of the adoptions of babies in New South Wales
Thomas Street Asylum completed and opened in 1904
For the first two years after The Benevolent Society vacated the old Pitt Street asylum, its handouts and care for
destitute women and children were continued from extremely cramped and temporary premises in Valentine
Lane.  As soon as The Benevolent Society received the compensation for its former headquarters, plans were
prepared for a building on a much larger site on the corner of
Quay and Thomas Street in Ultimo, next to the
Sydney markets.
The new building was to act as a hospital for infants, an asylum for destitute women and children, a handouts
distribution centre, and the general offices of The Benevolent Society. The foundation stone of the building was laid
by Benevolent Society President Renwick in September 1903 and the building was occupied about one year later.
From
http://www.benevolent.org.au/200--year--celebration/last--200/1900/thomas--street--asylum--completed--and--opened

Olga Florence Thomas: born 25th May 1905 at Womens Hospital Crown Street, Sydney. Mother Ellen Elizabeth
Thomas, spinster aged 34 born Liverpool, NSW. Witness was Ellen Thomas, mother of 267 Riley Street. Present
at birth were Nurse Solomon and Nurse Harper.
Crown Street Womens Hospital founded by Dr James Graham in 1893, the Women's Hospital in Crown Street
aimed to lift medical standards for maternity care. In addition to providing wards for surgical cases and
complicated births the Hospital provided treatment in homes.
Crown Street Women's Hospital,Initial funding of the Women's Hospital came from public subscription, obstetric
nurse training and student fees, with assistance from the Government in obtaining furniture and surgical
instruments. The Board of the Women's Hospital met for the first time on 13 August 1895.One of the Hospital's
early achievements was providing instruction to women who had previously acted as midwives without any
medical certification.

Muriel Joan Thomas: born 16th May 1907 at Royal Hospital for Women, Paddington. Mother Ellen Elizabeth
Thomas, spinster aged 27 [sic] born Liverpool, NSW. Informant was Ellen Elizabeth Thomas mother c/o Mrs
McCarthy, Riley Street, Woolloomooloo, witness Annie Maxted. Present at birth were Susie H O'Rielly and Sister
Hunter.
The Royal Hospital for Women is a maternity hospital that was established at Paddington in 1901 by the
Benevolent Society. It was designated the Royal Hospital for Women in 1904 and a new building opened in 1905.
The Royal Hospital for Women organised many of the adoptions of babies in New South Wales.


Death: Ellen Elizabeth Thomas of mental hospital Rydalmere died on 18th April 1918 aged 45. Parents are
recorded as John Thomas, carpenter, and Jane Fillimore [sic]. Cause of death was general paralysis of the
insane  -
a neuropsychiatric disorder affecting the brain, caused by late-stage syphilis. GPI was originally
considered a psychiatric disorder when it was first scientifically identified around the nineteenth century, as the
patient usually presented with psychotic symptoms of sudden and often dramatic onset. [Wikipedia]  
Ellen is
buried at Rookwood in the Independent section B grave 0001169.